Local and National Talk

Monday 6-9 p.m.

A rotating mix of local and regional public affairs programs airing Monday nights on KUMD.

COMING UP ON LOCAL AND NATIONAL TALK

October 23
6:00        Ojibwe Stories
6:30        Counterspin
7:00        Duluth City Council Meeting

October 30
6:00        Making Contact
7:00        Climate One
8:00        Alternative Radio

November 6
6:00        Making Contact
6:30        Counterspin
7:00        Duluth City Council Meeting

November 13
6:00       Making Contact
6:30       Counterspin
7:00       Climate One
8:00       Alternative Radio

November 20
6:00       Ojibwe Stories
6:30       Counterspin
7:00       Duluth City Council Meeting

November 27
6:00       Making Contact
6:30       Counterspin
7:00       Climate One
8:00      Alternative Radio

Ways to Connect

  

 All Summer KUMD is airing the voices of leadership on climate change.  Monday at 7 p.m. we bring you the special radio series Bioneers: Revolution from the Heart of Nature. In episode 1, Listen as Nalini Nadkarni shares her discoveries about the forest canopy, both scientific and inspirational.

 

Islamic Center of the Twin Ports

Since 9/11, extremist Muslims have been using their faith to justify jihad.  Other Muslims have protested against what they say is a distortion of Islam. Non-Muslim people, in many cases, know only what they read in the news and tend to lump all Muslims - and all poorly understood interpretations of the Quran - together. So whose job is it to educate people - those who are misunderstanding or those who are misunderstood?

Fond du Lac Tribal College

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa, Dan Jones shares with host Erik Redix an amusing story about miscommunication, and some thoughts on storytelling.  The first 12 minutes of the program are Dan's telling the story in Ojibwe, followed by his retelling of the story in English.

Dan Jones is from the Nigigoonsiminikaaning First Nation in Ontario and is an Anishinaabemowin ("Ojibwe language") teacher at Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College in Cloquet, Minnesota.

Nora Naranjo Morse

UMD’s 2nd Annual Creativity Conference was organized around the ideas of creativity across disciplines and cultures this year.  But as our free-ranging conversation with the two conference guests unspooled, it became apparent that creativity is not only useful in a wide variety of contexts … it lurks in some unlikely places.

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa, Larry Amik Smallwood and host Erik Redix talk about making maple syrup. 

Larry Amik Smallwood grew up in Aazhoomoog, the Lake Lena District of Mille Lacs.  He has worked as a language instructor for the Minneapolis Public Schools, Nay Ah Shing School, the Leech Lake Tribal College, and the University of Minnesota - Duluth.  Since 1999, he has served as the director of language and culture for the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe.

Flickr/Wolfram Burner

Since 1990, colleges and universities have been required by law to disclose campus safety information and also to take steps to keep students safe from sexual assault, stalking and dating violence.

When changes to strengthen the Clery Act nationally were finalized this fall, UMD's Dean of Students, Lisa Erwin, was one of the people responsible for developing those amendments.

Duluth Superintendent of Schools Bill Gronseth joined us to talk about the Think Kids Community Conversation starting this week.

Meetings of parents, neighbors, school administration and school board members will talk about what's going well and what could be done better in Duluth schools, how to address racism and what the recent in-depth demographic study means going forward.

(c) Robert Pearl Photography. All rights reserved.

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa, Brian McInnes talks with Obizaan [Lee Staples], a spiritual advisor for the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe, and Chato Gonzalez about their apprenticeship model of passing on language and traditional ways, and the vital importance of preserving that knowledge for future generations.

Flickr/Adam Fagen

We’re talking about free speech, freedom of the press and why it matters here at home.  Our guests in the studio are Don Shelby, veteran broadcast journalist and investigative reporter;  Kearsten Wesner, professor of media law at UMD and former practicing attorney and Rick Lubbers, the editor of the Duluth News Tribune.

Image from ojibwe.lib.umn.edu , an online Ojibwe People's Dictionary.

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa, Brian McInnes talks with Obizaan [Lee Staples], a spiritual advisor for the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe, and Chato Gonzalez about ceremonial traditions - including funerals - and striving for better cross-cultural cooperation and understanding.

 

2/16 Ojibwe Stories - Gaganoonididaa: Cross-Cultural Understanding

Duluth Police Chief Gordon Ramsay

“Black lives matter.” “Blue lives (meaning police officers) matter.”  Here in Duluth, we like to think all lives matter and in our comparatively small town, with a comparatively small number of people of color, we like to think that we don’t have the kinds of issues and tensions that you find in other places around the nation.

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa, host Erik Redix has a conversation with Dan Jones about his life growing up in Ontario, his family, and the practices of traditional storytelling.

 

1/19 Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa

Dan Jones is from the Nigigoonsiminikaaning First Nation in Ontario and is an Anishinaabemowin ("Ojibwe language") teacher at Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College in Cloquet, Minnesota.

CHUM Duluth

There will be plenty of time in 2015 to talk about the challenges in our community, but first, let's take some time to look at what went right in 2014.

From environmental issues, progress looking after the city's most vulnerable residents, to Duluth's splash after splash on national media, there's a lot going on to be excited about.

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa, Erik Redix has a conversation with Don Wedll, former Commissioner of Natural Resources for the Mille Lacs Band, about the landmark 1999 U.S. Supreme Court decision that reaffirmed the off-reservation hunting and fishing rights of Ojibwe Bands in the region.

 

12/15 Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa - Reaffirming Treaty Rights

Flickr/ CDC Global

Readers know that Ebola makes for a terrifying threat in novels.  Whether the characters are endangered by it as a flesh-eating disease or the bad guys are plotting bioterrorism with it, most people are only familiar with the virus as a plot contrivance in a book.

Once Ebola stepped off the page, though, and became a global concern – or panic, if you will – conflicting information AND conflicting attitudes began to emerge.

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