3/4 Criticism, protests and vigils in the cold: who decides about autopsies?

Mar 4, 2015

Two deaths, days apart, of Midewiwin  people have brought the conflict between secular practices and religious beliefs to the forefront.

Most people outside of tribal communities have never heard of Midewiwin, a religion that requires a body to be preserved intact for burial four days after death.

Tadd Johnson is a UMD professor and attorney who was called in to help the families gain custody of their loved ones after the medical examiner refused to release them.  He talks about where it all went wrong ... and how a change in Minnesota state law could benefit any families whose spiritual traditions forbid autopsies.

Tadd Johnson, a University of Minnesota Duluth professor and attorney who helped get a court order to give one of the families the body of a loved one - See more at: http://capitolchat.areavoices.com/tag/tadd-johnson/#sthash.1AIHYymb.dpufTadd Johnson, a University of Minnesota Duluth professor and attorney who helped get a court order to give one of the families the body of a loved one - See more at: http://capitolchat.areavoices.com/tag/tadd-johnson/#sthash.1AIHYymb.dpufTadd Johnson, a University of Minnesota Duluth professor and attorney who helped get a court order to give one of the families the body of a loved one - See more at: http://capitolchat.areavoices.com/tag/tadd-johnson/#sthash.1AIHYymb.dpufTadd Johnson, a University of Minnesota Duluth professor and attorney who helped get a court order to give one of the families the body of a loved one - See more at: http://capitolchat.areavoices.com/tag/tadd-johnson/#sthash.1AIHYymb.dpuf