Lisa Johnson

Morning Announcer

Lisa Johnson started her broadcast career anchoring the television news at her high school and spinning country music at KWWK/KOLM Radio in Rochester, Minnesota. She was a reporter and news anchor at KTHI in Fargo, ND (not to mention the host of a children's program called "Lisa's Lane") and a radio reporter and anchor in Moorhead, Bismarck, Wahpeton and Fergus Falls.

Since 1991, she has hosted Northland Morning on KUMD. One of the best parts of her job includes "paying it forward" by mentoring upcoming journalists and broadcasters on the student news team that helps produce Northland Morning.  She also loves introducing the different people she meets in her job to one another, helping to forge new "community connections" and partnerships.

Lisa has amassed a book collection weighing over two tons, and she enjoys reading, photography, volunteering with Animal Allies Humane Society and fantasizing about farmland.  She goes to bed at 8pm, long before her daughter, two cats, or three dogs.

Ways to Connect

Jason Carpenter/Flickr

Larry Weber says the darkness of this week leading up to the December 21 winter solstice is should be embraced, and a walk (or a cross country ski) under the starlit sky just a little "dose of humility."

Send me adrift./Flickr

Just this morning on Radio Gallery, North House Folk School Director Greg Wright said, "This world somehow makes us think we need permission to do things. 

Insights can come from unexpected places.

After a career in academia, publishing and lecturing on fairy tales, Jack Zipes hardly expected his 3,000-picture postcard collection to yield new insights.

But it did: over five pounds worth.

©Bryan French

 “And the Grinch, with his Grinch-feet ice cold in the snow, stood puzzling and puzzling, how could it be so? It came without ribbons. It came without tags. It came without packages, boxes or bags. And he puzzled and puzzled 'till his puzzler was sore. 

©Lisa Johnson

Every year, Tom Kasper runs down his list of good gifts for gardeners.

And every year, the most popular is still the gift of your time.

Andy S./St. Louis River Alliance/Facebook

Our week of art begins with the Seasons of the St. Louis River Photo Contest at Barker's Island a chance to celebrate the beauty of the St. Louis River and the tireless cleanup efforts that make it possible.

©Lisa Johnson

For The Birds host Laura Erickson stepped into the breach this week as the "emergency auxiliary backup Larry Weber" (after Larry was sidelined* with a bad cold),  armed with information about snowy owls and a Robert Frost poem off the top of her head.

*the expression "sidelined" comes from the world of sports, as Laura herself alluded to a text message after agreeing to sub for Larry this morning:

"But actually, I don't know how to do that -- just talk for a minute or longer.

Minnesota Ballet

Robert Gardener started his life in dance as a mouse.

A mouse in the perennial holiday favorite The Nutcracker, that is.

Then, as so many dancers do, he moved up in the ranks of the cast as he gained experience and skill.

After 25 years in Duluth, over 30 years of dancing Tchaikovsky's lush score and three different productions of Allen Field's choreography, Gardner is the artistic director and ballet master of the Minnesota Ballet.

"That's the point of any kind of travel, really. That it's transformational.  You become part of the world in a way that you weren't before."

~ Thomas Shevory

apalca/Flickr

Tackle box? Check.  Ice auger? Check.  Life jacket?

Huh?

Your best chance of surviving an accident on the ice of a frozen lake or river this winter can be summed up on two words: life jacket.

In just over a week, you could lose your access to some of your favorite streaming content on the internet or have to pay more for it ...

The FCC's vote on net neutrality next Thursday could lead to a definite chill on consumer's access to Netflix and other web content that, until now, has been available to everyone for the same price - and at the same speed.

National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition

The boarding school era for Native American children in America began with the opening of the Carlisle School in 1879. It was considered a more "merciful" solution to what was then thought of as "the Indian problem." 

It continued until the passage of the Indian Child Welfare act in 1978, when Native parents finally gained the legal right to deny their children's placement in off-reservation schools.

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