Lisa Johnson

Morning Announcer

Lisa Johnson started her broadcast career anchoring the television news at her high school and spinning country music at KWWK/KOLM Radio in Rochester, Minnesota. She was a reporter and news anchor at KTHI in Fargo, ND (not to mention the host of a children's program called "Lisa's Lane") and a radio reporter and anchor in Moorhead, Bismarck, Wahpeton and Fergus Falls.

Since 1991, she has hosted Northland Morning on KUMD. One of the best parts of her job includes "paying it forward" by mentoring upcoming journalists and broadcasters on the student news team that helps produce Northland Morning.  She also loves introducing the different people she meets in her job to one another, helping to forge new "community connections" and partnerships.

Lisa has amassed a book collection weighing over two tons, and she enjoys reading, photography, volunteering with Animal Allies Humane Society and fantasizing about farmland.  She goes to bed at 8pm, long before her daughter, two cats, or three dogs.

Ways to Connect

Sharon Moen/Minnesota Sea Grant

How can you have a conversation about improving water quality in Minnesota if you don't take Lake Superior into account?

Minnesota Sea Grant decided you can't.  So when Governor Mark Dayton launched his series of "25 by 25" Water Quality Initiative town hall meetings and the northeastern Minnesota session was scheduled in Ely, they decided to assemble a panel of experts and launch an online town hall.

Life House's new expansion is a ten-bed teen emergency shelter called The Loft.

The lack of affordable housing in Duluth plus misinformation - or no information - about why kids end up on the streets means there is still a gap between the number of kids with nowhere to go every night in Duluth  (100 on average) and the number of beds available.

Lack of affordable housing ... and a lack of imagination?  Life House director Maude Dornfeld says most people "can't imagine not loving their kids."

USFWS Mountain-Prairie/Flickr

The irony isn't lost on those who study these things.

Neonicotinoid pesticides were developed originally because they were thought to be less toxic to birds and wildlife than other options.  

The effects on pollinators are becoming widely examined  - and they're troubling - but now the MN DNR is into the third year of a study to see what happens to sharp-tailed grouse exposed to the chemicals.

And they're asking Minnesota grouse hunters to help them collect samples.

simpleinsomnia/Flickr

Back in the day, you had to work in the garden if you wanted to eat.

Then many folks (perhaps justifiably) began enjoying the convenience of fruits and veggies (canned, frozen or fresh) from the grocery store.

Master gardener Tom Kasper says the pendulum is swinging back again toward folks growing their own food, but he says the attitude now is that people get to garden; they don't have to.

Jim Moran/Flickr

Despite what social media tells us (on our screens, no less), the line "The people will not revolt. They will not look up from their screens long enough to notice what’s happening" did not come from George Orwell's 1949 novel 1984.

It did, however, come from the stage play based on the novel, an adaptation by Robert Icke and Duncan MacMillan that premiered in 2013.

Regardless, the book and the stage show have sparked plenty of discussion recently as they resonate with readers and audiences in ways Orwell never thought possible in 1949.

©Sparky Stensaas. Used with permission.

"I am but mad north-north-west. When the wind is southerly, I know a hawk from a handsaw." ~ Wm. Shakespeare, "Hamlet"

Whether or not Hamlet had spent any time at Hawk Ridge is a question for another time, but experienced birders know a northwesterly wind is best for seeing birds at what has become an internationally-recognized place to see migration.

Ira Salmela

The theme of Finland's 100th birthday is yhdessä, which means "together" in English. And Finns aren't letting a little thing like the five thousand miles separating the home country from the US stand in the way of all kinds of celebrations.

  One is a performance of the Runebergskören BSB, a Swedish-speaking male choir from Porvoo, Finland. And another is the performance of The Reading Room at the Douglas County Historical Society, a play written by Ann Tuomi based on a real-life experience.

Art, architecture and culture flow into this story of the creation of a terrazzo floor; a creation, ultimately, to be stepped into, not just stepped upon.

Forever Home 9/27

Sep 27, 2017

Rune

Rune is a calico short haired cat who is one and a half years old. She came to us as a stray from Duluth and is now looking for her new loving home! Rune has lovely yellow eyes and soft fur. She has extra toes on her feet that look like thumbs, and will knead them happily when you talk to her. Start petting her, and she'll lean into your hand to make sure she's getting a thorough chin rub.
She will be spayed, microchipped, and vaccinated by the time of adoption.

©Pat Thomas. Used with permission.

County Commissioner Frank Jewell isn't upset at all.

Despite the fact that he'd been pushing the St. Louis County Commission for six years to ban neonicotinoid pesticides and also to add bee- and butterfly friendly native plants, it wasn't until a group of citizens from the northern part of the county got behind the effort that things started to happen.

Minnesota Historical Society

The heartbreak of dementia, obviously, is losing the ability to connect with someone you love.

But the solution could soon be in the palm of your hand. 

The Minnesota Historical Society is the first museum outside the UK to adapt the National Museums Liverpool's House of Memories app, a collection of images designed to spark recognition, memories and conversations between folks with dementia and their caregivers or loved ones.

SafetyPosters.com

The riskiest thing we do as Americans, for the most part, is get in our cars and drive.

After that, every five days in Minnesota, someone gets hurt on the job.

Fabiola Milla/Flickr

As recently as the 1970s, domestic abuse was seen as a private matter between a husband and wife.

If the police were called, it wasn't unheard of for them to just suggest the offender "take a walk around the block" and cool off.

From that societal climate, beginning in the 1980s, Duluth has become an international innovator in the way communities keep victims safe and hold perpetrators accountable.

Duluth Art Institute

"In Situ" means "in it's original place.

But Studio 101 and the seven artists who create there is located on Michigan Street in Duluth.

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