Lisa Johnson

Morning Announcer

Lisa Johnson started her broadcast career anchoring the television news at her high school and spinning country music at KWWK/KOLM Radio in Rochester, Minnesota. She was a reporter and news anchor at KTHI in Fargo, ND (not to mention the host of a children's program called "Lisa's Lane") and a radio reporter and anchor in Moorhead, Bismarck, Wahpeton and Fergus Falls.

Since 1991, she has hosted Northland Morning on KUMD. One of the best parts of her job includes "paying it forward" by mentoring upcoming journalists and broadcasters on the student news team that helps produce Northland Morning.  She also loves introducing the different people she meets in her job to one another, helping to forge new "community connections" and partnerships.

Lisa has amassed a book collection weighing over two tons, and she enjoys reading, photography, volunteering with Animal Allies Humane Society and fantasizing about farmland.  She goes to bed at 8pm, long before her daughter, two cats, or three dogs.

Ways to Connect

©Lisa Johnson

With temperatures in the 40s forecast for Friday, this might be the perfect time to wrap the trees, bushes and other plantings you want to protect from woodland marauders.

Unless you have a job that lets you travel to many exotic locations, it's hard to meet enough different kinds of people to really expand your horizons.

Of course, readers already know that one of the best ways to do that is through books.

©Jonathan Thunder

Support for Superior artists (pun intended), the art of the John Beargrease Sled Dog Marathon, the animated Jonathan Thunder and more this week on Where's Art?

The  Beargrease Art Show is on display through March at the Great Lakes Aquarium; hear more about the show this week on Radio Gallery.

©Catherine Winter. Used with permission

"January can give us interesting days," remarks Larry Weber, dryly.  We set a record low of -33 January 18 in 1994, and a year ago at this time, we had temperatures in the mid-40s.

brando/Flickr

Duluth's infamously old housing stock combined with the recent spate of below-zero temperatures has prompted many folks to take a second look at weather-proofing ... and Ecolibrium3 in Duluth is one of the places that can help you do just that.

©Lisa Johnson

ned the head/Flickr

Duluth's trampoline park has a lot of kids - and their parents - bouncing into the ER these days.

Larry Weber joins us to talk about the winter issues that fascinate him, including something called "albedo." We also hear about how the January thaw affects the wildlife we see this time of year and how you can tell it's coyote mating season.

The ice ain't nice

Jan 12, 2018
Apostle Island National Lakeshore

There are a lot of things that are bad even though you can't tell by looking at them.

People, for example.  Novels. And ice. 

For example, the ice surrounding the mainland ice caves at the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore is abysmal.

In fact, it's so  irredeemably bad the only hope for opening the ice caves this year (they last opened in 2015)  is if a northeasterly wind blows it all out "to sea"?  "to lake"?  and new ice can form.

Bad ice is dangerous ice.  

Immigrants. Working-class people who feel they have no voice. Jobs.

Labor historian Gary Kaunonen talks about the conversations then and now ... and why he thinks  history - for everyone - should be a basic human right.

Tom Woodward/Flickr

Dr. Andrew Thompson is really frustrated.

He knows flu shots aren't perfect; he knows they're only 40-60% effective and that makes them hard to promote.

But the alternative, he says, can be worse.

Andreas/Flickr

Seed catalogs as wish books - and then mulch, flamethrowers as weed control and the many varieties of kohlrabi as we celebrate the Vegetable of the Year and 2018 itself.

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