Lisa Johnson

Morning Announcer

Lisa Johnson started her broadcast career anchoring the television news at her high school and spinning country music at KWWK/KOLM Radio in Rochester, Minnesota. She was a reporter and news anchor at KTHI in Fargo, ND (not to mention the host of a children's program called "Lisa's Lane") and a radio reporter and anchor in Moorhead, Bismarck, Wahpeton and Fergus Falls.

Since 1991, she has hosted Northland Morning on KUMD. One of the best parts of her job includes "paying it forward" by mentoring upcoming journalists and broadcasters on the student news team that helps produce Northland Morning.  She also loves introducing the different people she meets in her job to one another, helping to forge new "community connections" and partnerships.

Lisa has amassed a book collection weighing over two tons, and she enjoys reading, photography, volunteering with Animal Allies Humane Society and fantasizing about farmland.  She goes to bed at 8pm, long before her daughter, two cats, or three dogs.

Ways to Connect

Karen Roe/Flickr

Tom Kasper isn't a doctor, and he doesn't even play one on the radio.

But he is a master gardener.  And as we begin Mental Health Week on KUMD,  it turns out he knows a thing or two about how gardening can be good for what ails you.

Maria Ismawi/Flickr

Big surprise - movies and television are not always the most reliable sources when it comes to getting information about medical treatment.

Charles Rodstrom/Flickr

KUMD celebrates Mental Health Week with a series of interviews called Thinking Outside the Box.

There are new treatments for mental illness being developed all the time; and some of them are increasingly available here in the Northland.

Browse through the stories and look back at some of KUMD's award-winning mental health coverage in the past.

This Is Why Not: Finding Hope and Resilience in Troubled Times Spring 2017

Where's the best art opening this week?  What shows are closing?  Are there any calls-for-entries anywhere?  Annie Dugan brings you a comprehensive look at Where's Art every Monday morning at 8:20am on Northland Morning.

Arne Vainio

"In the Spirit of Medicine" is a new feature on Northland Morning, airing for the first time Monday, May 14 at 8:00am.

©Stevie Twining/KUMD

KUMD's Northland Morning host, Lisa Johnson, writes:

'I saw a video a while back with a nine year old, dressed in some kind of Elizabethan costume, singing an aria.

'So I sent it to my friend Elias Mokole, an opera singer and voice instructor here at UMD.

'"It’s beautiful," he wrote back, "except that she’s ruining her voice."

'Seriously?'

Lisa Johnson

A couple of things seemed to emerge from last month's Local Solutions to End Poverty Accountability Session: Duluth's lack of housing - and the cost of the housing there is - is becoming an issue for people of all income levels in the Northland.
 
One solution is the creation of an Affordable Housing Trust Fund ... but where is $3 million dollars a year going to come from?

One city councilor has a suggestion - but says you didn't hear it from him.

©MN Department of Natural Resources

April left and took the snow with her, says Larry Weber.

But the lack of moisture in many spots, plus the breezy conditions, means a high fire danger.

Author Yvonne Pearson's charming book for kids is the perfect read for little folks who might be uncertain about camping for the first time.

Sadie Braves the Wilderness is published by the Minnesota Historical Society Press.

©Lisa Johnson

Many wild animal moms leave their babies alone for lengths of time human moms would never consider.

Unlike two-legged mothers who love to show off their kids, animal moms disappear so they don't draw attention from predators to their little ones.

It's just one of the many ways caring for baby animals seems counter-intuitive to humans, and mistakes on our part can have fatal consequences. Luckily for us, help is just a click - or a phone call away.

©Emily Ford. Used with permission.

Emily Ford isn't the kind of gardener to sit around twiddling her thumbs when winter drags on.

The harsh winter took her bees, but she's already planning to restock the hives. And while she was waiting for spring to arrive, she tapped some friends to borrow gear and then tapped some maple trees.

Suffice it to say that this year, Glensheen will be abuzz with bees, in bloom with roses, and dripping with maple syrup.

©Mike Mayou. Used with permission.

High winds toppled acres of trees in July of 2016.  High winds, high waves and snow in October 2017.  More snow and dangerous waves on Lake Superior last month.

The occurrence - and recurrence - of severe storms is a topic of conversation these days, especially among the folks tasked with putting the damaged Lakewalk back together.  In fact, repairs from last fall's damage weren't even complete when the April 15 storm wrecked parts of it all over again.

Internet Archive Book Image/Flickr

If you're already bored gently raking up the soggy leaves and snow mold from your yard, Tom Kasper says it's the perfect time to divide things like rhubarb or hostas - and you certainly don't need a delicate touch.

Where's the best art opening this week?  What shows are closing?  Are there any calls-for-entries anywhere?  Annie Dugan brings you a comprehensive look at Where's Art every Monday morning at 8:20am on Northland Morning.Where's the best art opening this week?  What shows are closing?  Are there any calls-for-entries anywhere?  Annie Dugan brings you a comprehensive look at Where's Art every Monday morning at 8:20am on Northland Morning.

Larry Weber with a wrap up of April stats (three times as much snow, but precipitation still below normal), the migrants who've shown up just in the last week, and happy news on the frog front.

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