Lisa Johnson

Morning Announcer

Lisa Johnson started her broadcast career anchoring the television news at her high school and spinning country music at KWWK/KOLM Radio in Rochester, Minnesota. She was a reporter and news anchor at KTHI in Fargo, ND (not to mention the host of a children's program called "Lisa's Lane") and a radio reporter and anchor in Moorhead, Bismarck, Wahpeton and Fergus Falls.

Since 1991, she has hosted Northland Morning on KUMD. One of the best parts of her job includes "paying it forward" by mentoring upcoming journalists and broadcasters on the student news team that helps produce Northland Morning.  She also loves introducing the different people she meets in her job to one another, helping to forge new "community connections" and partnerships.

Lisa has amassed a book collection weighing over two tons, and she enjoys reading, photography, volunteering with Animal Allies Humane Society and fantasizing about farmland.  She goes to bed at 8pm, long before her daughter, two cats, or three dogs.

Ways to Connect

©Nicole Modeen/The Duluth Playhouse Childen's Theatre

If you're hoping to get in to see the Duluth Playhouse's production of Disney's The Lion King JR., well, Duluth has sold out shows just like the Big Cities ... and rush lines (or lists), too.

Barbara Friedman/Flickr

Just when you think you've had it with the gray, sleety weather, Larry Weber reminds us of crocuses and vernal ponds.

Bea Ojakangas has written a lot of cookbooks over the years ... and delivered a lot of talks about it.

In fact, one of those talks, called "Cooking Up A Book," prompted the University of Minnesota Press to ask for this new book: a memoir (with recipes).

Forever Home 3/23

Mar 23, 2017

Moose | Animal Allies

Moose is an orange and white Domestic Longhair who is 6 years old. He came to us from a previous home and is now looking for his new loving home! Moose and Blackie are a solid pair. Where they go one, they go all. Moose is a timid, gentle fellow who desires a low key place to call home. 

Lily | Animal Allies

©Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

It's mud season.

Which has Minnesotans thinking about spring which has them thinking about summer which has them thinking about being outside.

This year, the Minnesota State Parks and Trails unveil a new park, a new bison, and a variety of times and places to get yourself seriously sticky.

©John Krumm

John Doberstein says he cringes when the conversation becomes "What's better?  Good mining jobs or tourism jobs paying minimum wage?"

In fact, the Duluth for Clean Water organizer has gone on the record more than once saying he rejects the ideas that it's "jobs v. the environment" or "the Iron Range v. the Cities."

Doberstein isn't afraid of tough conversations - he just wants them to start - and focus on - what brings people together, and one of those things, he believes, are good-paying jobs that allow people to live, work and raise families in the Northland.

Tom Kasper

Those weird lights glowing at all hours in Tom Kasper's basement?

Grow lights, trying to give his onion seedlings the 60-70 degrees and the 14 hours of daylight they need to grow into fine, big, grown-up onions.

That's our story and we're sticking to it.

Michelle Riley/The HSUS

Tens of thousands of animal welfare documents were removed from the USDA's website at the beginning of February, and although some have been reposted, local and national animal welfare advocates continue to press the USDA to restore them.

The USDA maintains the records were removed in an ongoing effort to "balance the need for transparency with rules protecting individual privacy." 

The Animal Welfare Act oversees research labs, zoos, circuses and animal breeders: almost eight thousand facilities.

Tribal members of the Lower Sioux Indian Community were frustrated with the lack of cultural awareness when it came to their health care and by a "fragmented" system that made it hard to track native health concerns.

But they had hope that they could create better access to care by opening their own clinic ... and also create employment opportunities beyond casino jobs.

Alison Aune

Elizabeth Kuth's artist talk this week on sustaining art over the course of a lifetime ...

A free Feminist Femmage Cultural Goddess workshop with Alison Aune on Friday ...

Laboring away quietly in the basement of the Duluth Depot, the Underground is busy making theater.  In recent weeks,  we've featured productions like Green Day's American Idiot and Gilbert and Sullivan's Ruddigore.  Now the 12th Annual Short Shorts Film Festival returns with another crop of entries: all five minutes long or less and all family-friendly.  But this is not a quaint little local event; the festival features submissions from Asia, Europe, Israel and South America, not to mention states all over the US.

©Lisa Johnson

We're seeing the "effect" in "lake effect" this week ... but late season snows make it tough on birds and animals, returning migrants and winter-long residents.

The wave of grassroots feminist organizing that built beginning in the late '70s had its origin in some unlikely places.

Women who immigrated to America from Finland - some of whom came alone - had had the right to vote since 1906, and they got right to work organizing and publishing a feminist newspaper.

The Anishinaabe had a long woman-centric tradition until the advent of the boarding schools, where women were honored in the society.

And then there's the lake and the wilderness. "It draws certain kinds of people," says author Beth Bartlett.  "It's restorative."

Cindy Woods

Ryan Frane agrees jazz is kind of like football or fine wine: you do enjoy it more when you learn a little more about it.

Pages