Chris Harwood

Production Director

Chris Harwood grew up in Duluth, and as a high school student he was a volunteer announcer at KUMD.  He received a BA in Music from Macalester College in 1993, and an MA in Musicology from Columbia University in 2004.  Upon returning to Duluth in 2006, he resumed volunteering as the host of Blues Alley until 2013.  As a volunteer, he also created and continues to host Soul Village since it began in early 2009.

Now also employed as KUMD's Production Director, Chris oversees the creation of pre-recorded announcements and many other on-air programs, including Women's Words and Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa.  On the air, he can be heard regularly on Music Through the Day on Mondays and Tuesdays, on Soul Village on Friday afternoons, and occasionally hosts Northland Morning as well. 

Chris is a musician, a music historian, and an avid record collector.  He has worked as an audio engineer, an arranger, and a record producer.  In the mid-1990s Chris was the Music Coordinator for A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor.  He has also worked for BMI, The Lake Superior Chamber Orchestra, and worked behind the scenes for many musicals and concerts in New York City. 

Ways to Connect

Scot Nelson [via Flickr]

Tom Kasper talks about how the abundance of rain and resulting humidity in recent months is leading to a rise in powdery mildew, a fungal growth that affects many plants.  Gardeners are advised to look out for it, and possibly remove affected leaves to increase airflow around their plants help stave off its spread.

As part of our Sustainability Week series on Northland Morning, we speak with Tristen Eberling from Ecolibrium3 about the Giving Comfort at Home program.  Many of our neighbors in Duluth are living in energy poverty.  Deciding whether to “heat or eat” happens too often with our long winters and old housing stock.

Intellect Ltd

Annie Dugan tells us about three big events coming up this week in the Duluth art scene:

- An exhibit at Zeitgeist by Kip Praslowicz - Watershed: Wild Humans,

- Sarah Brokke's exhibit, Reliquaries of the Sacred Feminine, opens this Friday at 315 Gallery, and

As part of our Sustainability Week series on Northland Morning, we speak with Randy Hanson, PhD, the Co-Director of the Program in Environment and Sustainability at UMD about goings on at the UMD Land Lab, including their recently built "high tunnel" greenhouse, ongoing research in hydroponics, and the upcoming Farm Fest 2017 on September 17 at the UMD Sustainable Agriculture Project (SAP) Farm.

Courtney Celley/USFWS.

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa we have a conversation with Dennis Jones about the 

Ojibwe language, naming ceremonies, offering tobacco and more. Jones recently retired from years as an Ojibwe language instructor at the University of Minnesota. He is a band member of Nigigoonsiminikaaning First Nation, located in the Treaty Three territory in northwestern Ontario.  He is the author of Daga Anishinaabemodaa: Let's Speak Ojibwe, an Ojibwe Word List and Phrase Book, illustrated by Aza Erdrich.

Originally aired 11/21/16

Jared Smith [via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber observes that so many things are happening in nature this week, from the mushrooms down low to the ground all the way up to the Perseids and the upcoming solar eclipse.  The rainfall totals for August (and the summer) are above normal. The hawks and ospreys will soon be on the move over Duluth, many insects are maturing, and the blackberries are ripening too.

Aimee Foster from Community Action Duluth talks about their efforts to collect extra and unwanted apples for making Fruit Bits, a transitional employment program that turns otherwise unused apples into healthful and affordable fruit leathers sold at local stores.

Vintage Books / Penguin Random House LLC

Our guest on this episode of MN Reads is Peter Geye, the author of Wintering, published in 2016 by Vintage Books.  This novel, his third, revolves around the lives of Harry Eide, who has gone missing in the woods of Northern Minnesota, his son Gustav Eide, and their friend Berit Lovig.

MN Reads is produced at KUMD with funding provided in part by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

Everyone is talking about the solar eclipse, occurring Monday across the north American continent.  In the Duluth area, it will not be total eclipse, a mere 80% coverage of the moon over the sun, but that is still a spectacular event to see.

liz west [Via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber talks about his many finds this week, including Indian pipe (thriving in shady woods), basswood trees that are in bloom, mushrooms, and Queen Anne's Lace, blooming in northwestern Wisconsin.  Many songbirds are quieting down now that the fledglings are leaving the nest, although goldfinches are only now starting to nest.  Young frogs are maturing, fawns and bear cubs are out exploring with their mothers, and masses of mayflies are emerging to briefly breed before they die.

Open Books

Our guest on this episode of MN Reads is Lorin R. Robinson, the author of Tales From The Warming published in 2017 by Open Books.

Combining scientific fact with narrative fiction, the book is a collection of 10 short stories set in the near future at different locations around the globe.  Robinson's characters struggle to manage, mitigate, or at least come to grips with inevitable change due to the effects of global warming in their environments.

There are TWO opportunities this weekend to participate in a detailed look at the natural world in the Northland.  It is BioBlitz weekend at the Sax-Zim Bog and at Hawk Ridge.   The two events will allow the avid naturalist and outdoor enthusiast to explore familiar sites with greater detail.

Friends of the Bird Sanctuary (FOTBS) of the Douglas County Wildlife Area in Gordon, Wisconsin invites members and the community to Barrens Fest 2017, a celebration of the globally significant landscape of Northwest Wisconsin.  The event is this afternoon (Wednesday July 19) from 3 pm to 6:30 pm at the Clubhouse of the Douglas County Wildlife Area, located between Solon Springs and Gordon, Wisconsin. The festival is free and open to the public. A picnic supper will be hosted by FOTBS at 6:00 p.m.

Sharon Mollerus [via Flickr]

Last month, the Minnesota Legislature passed a $988 million bonding bill, including $25.4 million in funding for the St. Louis River Estuary Restoration Project.  This funding will ALSO trigger the awarding of $47.2 million in federal funds made available through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative to accelerate the cleanup efforts of the St. Louis River and the Duluth- Superior Harbor.  We talk with Kris Eilers, Executive Director of St. Louis River Alliance, about the vital clean-up projects this funding makes possible.

No, it is neither "mosquito season" nor "road construction season."  It is actually mural season here in the northland, with large-scale artworks being unveiled around town this week, including:

Yesterday a new mural was unveiled in Lincoln Park on the side of the Frost River building (1910 West Superior Street) by artist Paul LeJeunesse, a Duluth Art Institute artist-in-residence.

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