Arts

Arts and culture

This week a unique intersection of art and science is on display in the Duluth community. Catch"Black Gold: Lake Sturgeon Zine Release and Art Exhibit," at Prøve Gallery with a gathering and panel discussion about the most ancient fish around - the sturgeon.

You can see over 40 sturgeon works of art on display in large format at Prøve Gallery plus pick up the zine, a printing off all the images. All proceeds from the sale of the zine go toward traveling this exhibit to communities on the Great Lakes including this Duluth show.

Artist Anna Metcalfe and native pollinator and native plant enthusiast Dan Schutte explore the intersections between art, plants, pollinators and food in the second part of a three part series called Earth: Clay + Science.  This installment does actually include a pop-up picnic.  You can find more information here:

A chance viewing of the Puppet State Theatre Company of Scotland's The Man Who Planted Trees five years ago  resulted in a performance of the show at UWS ... plus community partnerships to give tickets to the show and copies of the book to area schoolchildren.  

Bardia Photography/Flickr

Duluth Poet Laureate Ellie Schoenfeld hosts the Readings from Seven Nations open mic event, featuring poetry from the seven nations blocked by excecutive order from travel or immigration to the US: Iran, Libya, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, and Syria.

When canoe enthusiasts Mark Neuzil and Norman Sims set out to write the first book on the history of canoes in the entire North American continent, their goal was to find the best illustrations they could.

To that end, they commissioned two oil paintings and a series of maps from a Minnesota cartographer to create a book that, more than anything, seems to be about memories.

amy/Flickr

It's a common enough trope in romantic comedies: one partner's fondness for foreign films with subtitles is often the dealbreaker.

Far from being elitist or boring, the criteria for the 2nd annual international film series, Building Bridges, was to find movies to show the audience "a piece of the world that would fascinate them."

Radio Gallery: Ritual

Mar 28, 2017
Molly Streiff

Next week ceramic artists Molly Streiff and Andrew Rivera open their senior art exhibit at the Tweed Museum of Art.  Seniors in the UMD School of Fine Arts, Streiff and Rivera are showing their work together after many years of sharing studio space and throwing pots side by side.  Inspired by ceremonial vessels used in burial and the daily rituals surrounding food and drink, their exhibit  spotlights ritual in life and in death.

Their exhibit "Ritual" is on display Tuesday April 4 - April 9 at the Tweed with an opening  reception, Tuesday April 4, 4-6pm.

Tweed Museum of Art

Annie Dugan, curator and executive director of the Duluth Art Institute, says the Tweed Museum of Arts weekly senior exhibitions are more than final projects: they're a look at what new young artists are thinking and creating about.

©Nicole Modeen/The Duluth Playhouse Childen's Theatre

If you're hoping to get in to see the Duluth Playhouse's production of Disney's The Lion King JR., well, Duluth has sold out shows just like the Big Cities ... and rush lines (or lists), too.

Bea Ojakangas has written a lot of cookbooks over the years ... and delivered a lot of talks about it.

In fact, one of those talks, called "Cooking Up A Book," prompted the University of Minnesota Press to ask for this new book: a memoir (with recipes).

Over the next few weeks I will be covering the senior art students in the UMD School of Fine Arts as they share their final exhibitions before graduation in the spring.  Currently in the Tweed Museum of Art is Nevada Littlewolf's "This is What Democracy Looks Like.

Opening Tuesday March 28th is a show of ceramic sculpture from artist Erica Kachinske in a show "called "Innermost,  about queer people and the space they take up."

Alison Aune

Elizabeth Kuth's artist talk this week on sustaining art over the course of a lifetime ...

A free Feminist Femmage Cultural Goddess workshop with Alison Aune on Friday ...

Laboring away quietly in the basement of the Duluth Depot, the Underground is busy making theater.  In recent weeks,  we've featured productions like Green Day's American Idiot and Gilbert and Sullivan's Ruddigore.  Now the 12th Annual Short Shorts Film Festival returns with another crop of entries: all five minutes long or less and all family-friendly.  But this is not a quaint little local event; the festival features submissions from Asia, Europe, Israel and South America, not to mention states all over the US.

The wave of grassroots feminist organizing that built beginning in the late '70s had its origin in some unlikely places.

Women who immigrated to America from Finland - some of whom came alone - had had the right to vote since 1906, and they got right to work organizing and publishing a feminist newspaper.

The Anishinaabe had a long woman-centric tradition until the advent of the boarding schools, where women were honored in the society.

And then there's the lake and the wilderness. "It draws certain kinds of people," says author Beth Bartlett.  "It's restorative."

Cindy Woods

Ryan Frane agrees jazz is kind of like football or fine wine: you do enjoy it more when you learn a little more about it.

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