Arts

Arts and culture

Vintage Books / Penguin Random House LLC

Our guest on this episode of MN Reads is Peter Geye, the author of Wintering, published in 2016 by Vintage Books.  This novel, his third, revolves around the lives of Harry Eide, who has gone missing in the woods of Northern Minnesota, his son Gustav Eide, and their friend Berit Lovig.

MN Reads is produced at KUMD with funding provided in part by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

Camargo Foundation

Open to all early-career artists in Minnesota, the deadline to apply for the 2018 Jerome Foundation Fellowships is Friday, September 15, 2017.  

Rosemary Guttormsson

The 4th Annual Art Festival at Brighton Beach happens all day Saturday, August 12, 9 a.m.

Christopher Selleck

Seth Korpi has a solo show at Zeitgeist ... the theme for this week's Art Canopy at the Duluth Art Institute is watercolor, the Lake Superior Art Festival at Brighton Beach is coming up this weekend, and Annie Dugan has composed a poem for this week's Artist Talk:

You can find inspiration anywhere

Given the choice between a cash prize for their annual contest and a chance to get published, the Lake Superior Writers voted back in 2016 to get published.

The result is one of the best possible souvenirs of the Northland: a book about the lake by people who live near it and love it.

Chris Dunn

Check out "Duluth Noir," a new summer exhibit from local artist Chris Dunn of Rooster Tail Ink, on view at the Red Herring Lounge. Dunn has created a new body of work in his unique ink drawing style with a series evoking Duluth's urban landscape.  Dunn's work combines thick, lush lines with a quick and light hand, achieved through multiple renderings. Offering many versions of the each work rather than one final selection, sheds light on his process and perspectives.  

Duluth Fiber Handcrafters Guild

The Duluth Fiber Handcrafters Guild takes over the Art Canopy event with Get Threaded! tomorrow ...

Shawna Gilmore's "woodland fiction" opens at the Lakeside Gallery on Wednesday ...

Annie Dugan

What does it take to make the filmmaker's grapevine?

Sundance on your resume? Cannes?

"Hey, my movie was shown in a barn?"

Lois Rafferty has spoken, written and taught about issues of grief and loss for years.

But it wasn't until she wrote Carnie's Child that she learned that "everyone has a painful story inside of them."

Fans of old movies know any kids who have a barn are excited to put on a show. Kids without barns, though, have been turning to Hillside Youth Theatre Summer Camps for over fifteen years now.

It's an immersive experience involving everything from acting to set-building to costume creation ... with a little skills-learning and confidence-building on the side.

Along with many short films and animations playing this weekend at the Free Range Film Festival, Minneapolis native Dean Peterson brings his second feature length film, "What Children Do," a dark comedy tale of two estranged sisters.  We are joined this week by writer and director, Dean Peterson who will be at the Free Range Film Festival for a post-show Q & A.

John Akre

The Duluth Art Institute's executive director will be an art instructor come the start of the school year ... but in the meantime, Annie Dugan is still our host for Where's Art.

In other news, John Akre's Demolition Dreaming will be showcased at this weekend's Free Range Film Festival ...

Tomorrow, the Duluth Art Institute hosts Polaroids! ...

Open Books

Our guest on this episode of MN Reads is Lorin R. Robinson, the author of Tales From The Warming published in 2017 by Open Books.

Combining scientific fact with narrative fiction, the book is a collection of 10 short stories set in the near future at different locations around the globe.  Robinson's characters struggle to manage, mitigate, or at least come to grips with inevitable change due to the effects of global warming in their environments.

A rare screening of local animation is showing 7pm on Thursday July, 20 at Teatro Zuccone.  A collection of films by local artist Jonathan Thunder is an exciting part of his new exhibit “Peripheral Vignettes” at the Duluth Art Institute.  

No, it is neither "mosquito season" nor "road construction season."  It is actually mural season here in the northland, with large-scale artworks being unveiled around town this week, including:

Yesterday a new mural was unveiled in Lincoln Park on the side of the Frost River building (1910 West Superior Street) by artist Paul LeJeunesse, a Duluth Art Institute artist-in-residence.

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